The Virtuous Cyborg: Spring 2018

Giacomeli TreeThrough a mutual decision between myself and the publisher, The Virtuous Cyborg has been put back to early 2018. This is mainly because I am too busy with both consultancy and teaching commitments this Autumn, and will not be able to get fully behind promoting the book before January-February 2018.

We are now listing the release date as ‘Spring 2018’.

Opening image is Abstract Modern Tree Landscape by Amy Giacomelli, which I found here on Fine Art America. As ever, no copyright infringement is intended and I will take the image down if asked.


Edited Manuscript of The Virtuous Cyborg

Squint_logoJust this second, I finished going through the copy editor’s version of the manuscript for The Virtuous Cyborg. She did a great job! Very attentive to the grammar, which I’d expect, but also thoughtful about the way emphasis had been applied. There's lots of good copy editors around, but the truly great ones can get into the head of the author and think through the book as well as the grammatical minutiae... great to encounter.

She also had this wonderful capsule review that she sent the editor:

The book was really excellent. Compelling and well-written, it provides an introduction to the complicated intersection between technology and philosophy, which proves exceptionally relevant to everyday life. The addition of a glossary and author's note with reference attribution simplifies the main text while still allowing for further clarification.

Completing this step  moves me from ‘unedited MS’ to ‘edited MS’. One step closer to publication!


Announcing the Publisher

Virtuous Cyborg TeaserIt gives me great pleasure to announce that The Virtuous Cyborg will be published by Squint Books, the cultural and political imprint of renowned poetry micro-press Eyewear Publishing. We are planning for an Autumn 2017 release date.

You can read the blurb, and a short introduction for the publisher and author, over on the new book blog at cyborg.ihobo.com.

Check it out!


Coming Soon: The Virtuous Cyborg

Neuron ChaosIt gives me great pleasure to formally announce my new book project, The Virtuous Cyborg, which builds upon the cybervirtue discussions going on here at Only a Game this year. A publisher has already invited me to place the book with them, but I will not announce who it is until later this year when we’ve dotted the i’s and crossed the t’s. I will just say for now that they are are a small independent press with a commitment to virtuous publishing and nurturing talent outside of the mainstream corporate system, and they feel like a great fit for my philosophy writing.

The new book will be another short form text like Wikipedia Knows Nothing, but will not have a free edition as I am committed to repaying the investment of both trust and money the publisher is making by publishing me, and their situation means they have to be practical about making ends meet. (ETC Press, as an academic publisher, had different priorities, and I’m very grateful to them for being there when WKN needed a home).

At this time, I am inviting pre-readers to read the draft manuscript, that will be ready some time in April. All you need to be as a pre-reader is someone I have already spoken to (in any medium) with an interest in my philosophy and the time to read a 30,000 word manuscript in April-May this year. I will need feedback in less than a month, so please make sure you have the time to help out.

Interested? Contact me through the usual channels, including comments here if you have no other option.

The opening image is a free texture from TextureX.com which I found here, used under their license and remaining under their copyright.


Likened to Hume

Always pleasant to hear nice things about your own work, but my email this morning had an especially joyous moment when a book editor not only offered me a gig but wrote of Imaginary Games:

…I came to your book with enthusiasm. It did not disappoint. In fact, aside from the great exposition of ideas I found your prose style astonishingly lucid and generous. Hume came to mind.

Being compared to Hume is a great complement, since not only was he Scottish (I am one quarter Scottish, on my mother’s side) but like me he was also an ‘outsider philosopher’, utterly disconnected from the academic philosophy of his day. A great start to my week!


WKN: Reviews Wanted!

WKN Free PDF QRAt the moment, there are no reviews of Wikipedia Knows Nothing anywhere at all. It would be great to raise that number by an infinite degree through the simple expedient of having at least one review on, say, Amazon.com, Amazon.co.uk, or indeed anywhere else where book reviews live.

If you’ve already read the book, please consider writing a short review for a suitable site, and if you haven’t, why not scan this QR code and pull down the free PDF, or follow the link above for details of the paperback or ebook? Your assistance is appreciated!


WKN: The Author's Copy

WKN-shelfThere’s a special pleasure in unwrapping the package that has your own book in it, something that doesn’t come along every day. A pleasing object, Wikipedia Knows Nothing the paperback; she has the same form factor as some low-print run role-playing games I was given by a good friend in Tennessee. Sitting her up on my top philosophy shelf next to my ‘imaginative investigations’ trilogy shows just how light and nimble she turned out. Who could be threatened by such a small thing?


Wikipedia Knows Nothing - Out Now!

What does the Wikipedia know, and how can it know it? More to the point, how can anyone using an anonymously edited source, the contents of which change on a daily basis, know that what they are reading constitutes knowledge? In this provocative challenge to contemporary concepts of objectivity, four figures of knowledge – the Wikipedia, scientific experiments, anonymous peer review, and school education – are investigated in order to question the way we understand the world around us.

Rather than support the classical view of an objective world 'out there' that our beliefs must accord with in order to count as knowledge, Wikipedia Knows Nothing argues that all facts are the residue of skilled activities and that knowledge is better understood as a practice. Furthermore, rather than a single 'real world', the many worlds that we each live within form a multiverse about which our subjective knowledge-practices give us broader understandings than the objective knowledge produced by experimental apparatus.

The merit of the sciences doesn't lie in their possessing the only path to truth, but in their capacity to develop knowledge-practices that can resist objections across all worlds. This leads to an urgent need to recognise the role of practices in creating and maintaining knowledge, and the different ways that truth can be stitched together into distinct but non-contradictory patchworks of 'real worlds'. When we do, we must question any claim that knowledge can come from anonymous individuals exercising an unchecked power to silence others – whether this happens on the internet in wikis, or in professional academic discourse.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 License.

Purchase Print or eBook from Lulu.com, or Download for free.

Cross-posted from ETC Press.